Tagged: AFIM

liat yossifor

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-solid-paintings-space

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-circles-shapes

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-spiral-texture

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-thick-slabs-of-paint

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-lines-solid

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-v-texture-black

liat-yossifor-interview-by-daniel-rolnik-textured-paint

Sharon Sharón Zoldan

guided a 30 person tour through her space a couple months back. she was preparing for a soon-to-be sold out show in new york. so much paint. i could swim in her paint.

images photographed by daniel rolnik and asuka hisa

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Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol at LACMA

Israeli choreography Noa Eshkol was recently rediscovered by Los Angeles-based artist Sharon Lockhart. Eshkol’s Wachman notation system was largely dismissed by contemporaries. And yet, her dedicated followers continue to practice her meditative dances to the rhythm of a metronome. The performances are stoic and spiritual in their monotony. We get a better sense of Eshkol’s strict discipline and extraordinary preliminary processes through Lockhart’s presentation. The images above were presented alongside videos of Eshkol’s troupe dancing. The small spherical objects are sculptures meant to emulate the movement of particular joints in the body. The posters are drawings that bring these visuals into a context that is easier to interprete. Lockhart photographed the miniature models and elevated them to the status of sculptural artworks in their own right. Lockhart also documented Eshkol’s dances for the first time. In an effort to preserve and continue the choreographer’s legacy. Projecting them onto huge blocks acting like blank canvases, Lockhart beautifully captures this rhythmic and ritual-like language. At the foreground, the dancers entrall us with their slow, exacting interpretations. Behind them are displayed tapestries, or “wall carpets,” as Eshkol calls them. They are composed on found materials, but laid out precisely by Eshkol herself. She then would have her community of followers sit and sew them together in a gathering reminiscent of the work ethic of early kibbutzes.