Tagged: female

erin morrison

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Ilit Azoulay

Ilit Azoulay, Hisin series, staircase, 2011, 23x51 inch, inkjet print

passagelarge

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Here, the artist says it best:

Artist Statement

My work is based on processed photographic montage, which involves field research and computerized finalization. The works contain thousands of images reorganized and remodeled together to create new utopian venues.Oftentimes I start by spotting buildings that are slated for demolition. Usually they are located in the old, southern parts of Tel-Aviv, where I live.

In my studio, I clean and oil objects from the sites – sometime even interfering with the original shape or color – that is, I remodel them. When they are ready for the ‘stage’, I photograph each object separately, oftentimes from the same angle, using the same macro-lens and under the same light to ensure their homorganic status; the photographed objects will serve to facilitate democratic viewing conditions, which eliminates all hierarchies. At this point I start the process of constructing the “wall” in Photoshop. On this artificial structured canvas, I place and arrange the photographed objects, forming large-scale panoramas that simulate a fictitious space.

The human vision is functional and goal-oriented, so it often misses alternative possibilities of perception and observation.
 Guided by the desire to expand these possibilities, I am interested in creating utopian, fictitious, even ‘impossible’ spaces that point toward the limitations of sight and undermine the conventional process of seeing. Through them I wish to make the gap between perception and the construction of meaning present.

Meret Oppenheim. Object. Paris, 1936

This Surrealist object was inspired by a conversation between Oppenheim and artists Pablo Picasso and Dora Maar at a Paris cafe. Admiring Oppenheim’s fur-covered bracelet, Picasso remarked that one could cover anything with fur, to which she replied, ‘Even this cup and saucer.’ Soon after, when asked by André Breton, Surrealism’s leader, to participate in the first Surrealist exhibition dedicated to objects, Oppenheim bought a teacup, saucer, and spoon at a department store and covered them with the fur of a Chinese gazelle. In so doing, she transformed genteel items traditionally associated with feminine decorum into sensuous, sexually punning tableware.