Tagged: israel

ori gersht

A series of large-scale photographs by Ori Gersht: exploding floral arrangements and still lifes, based upon work by 17th century Spanish painter Juan Sanchez Cotán and 19th century paintings by Henri Fantin-Latour

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liat yossifor

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Sharon Sharón Zoldan

guided a 30 person tour through her space a couple months back. she was preparing for a soon-to-be sold out show in new york. so much paint. i could swim in her paint.

images photographed by daniel rolnik and asuka hisa

lea golda holterman

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My favorites of her Orthodox Eros series: erotic and homosexual undertones but photographed in an Old Masters’ light that is romantic and yet uncomfortably real. They are nostalgic, dramatic and very baroque. The last, with it’s clown collar, mocks the institution of religion as fanaticism. It also goes a step further as a reference to the Shakespearean collars of a by-gone era. We are at once reminded of how antiquated some of these systems are and how silly they may appear to outsiders.

moshe kupferman

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moshe kupferman

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Contacted the head of his collection in Israel. Toured his old atelier, which is now a museum. Browsed some works on paper in storage, and purchased a piece! It shows the element of the grid – the parallel lines and the criss-cross lines – a recurrent everyday framework that is present throughout Kupferman’s oeuvre. It also demonstrates his Free Variations, exposing the performative-musical dimension of his painting: elements appear, disappear, and reappear, and in the process bring about the creation of a rhythmic and melodious practice that is the artist’s unique language.

Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol at LACMA

Israeli choreography Noa Eshkol was recently rediscovered by Los Angeles-based artist Sharon Lockhart. Eshkol’s Wachman notation system was largely dismissed by contemporaries. And yet, her dedicated followers continue to practice her meditative dances to the rhythm of a metronome. The performances are stoic and spiritual in their monotony. We get a better sense of Eshkol’s strict discipline and extraordinary preliminary processes through Lockhart’s presentation. The images above were presented alongside videos of Eshkol’s troupe dancing. The small spherical objects are sculptures meant to emulate the movement of particular joints in the body. The posters are drawings that bring these visuals into a context that is easier to interprete. Lockhart photographed the miniature models and elevated them to the status of sculptural artworks in their own right. Lockhart also documented Eshkol’s dances for the first time. In an effort to preserve and continue the choreographer’s legacy. Projecting them onto huge blocks acting like blank canvases, Lockhart beautifully captures this rhythmic and ritual-like language. At the foreground, the dancers entrall us with their slow, exacting interpretations. Behind them are displayed tapestries, or “wall carpets,” as Eshkol calls them. They are composed on found materials, but laid out precisely by Eshkol herself. She then would have her community of followers sit and sew them together in a gathering reminiscent of the work ethic of early kibbutzes.

Sigal Primor: Awry

SCULPTURES 2010-2011

I worked briefly at Chelouche Gallery in Tel Aviv, Israel. This was the exhibit on view at the time. These prolific pieces show a technical skill that is extraordinarily meticulous and idiosyncratic.

There is a masculinity to the constructed forms that is complimented by the organic, earth-toned felt that is inviting to the touch. They clash both physically and metaphorically: metal vs. material, male vs. female.

Untitled (1), 2010, Mixed media, 161X70X210 cm

Untitled (2), 2010, Mixed media, 177X83X184 cm

Untitled (2), 2010, Mixed media, 177X83X184 cm (Detail)

Untitled (3), 2010, Mixed media, 238X192X310 cm

Untitled (3), 2010, Mixed media (Detail)

Untitled (3), 2010, (Felt Detail)

Untitled (4), 2010, Mixed Media

Untitled (4), 2010, Mixed Media (Detail)

Untitled (5), 2010, Installation (Detail 2 Segments of a chair)

Awry, Installation View, Chelouche Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel