Tagged: israeli

ori gersht

A series of large-scale photographs by Ori Gersht: exploding floral arrangements and still lifes, based upon work by 17th century Spanish painter Juan Sanchez Cotán and 19th century paintings by Henri Fantin-Latour

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liat yossifor

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Sharon Sharón Zoldan

guided a 30 person tour through her space a couple months back. she was preparing for a soon-to-be sold out show in new york. so much paint. i could swim in her paint.

images photographed by daniel rolnik and asuka hisa

lea golda holterman

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My favorites of her Orthodox Eros series: erotic and homosexual undertones but photographed in an Old Masters’ light that is romantic and yet uncomfortably real. They are nostalgic, dramatic and very baroque. The last, with it’s clown collar, mocks the institution of religion as fanaticism. It also goes a step further as a reference to the Shakespearean collars of a by-gone era. We are at once reminded of how antiquated some of these systems are and how silly they may appear to outsiders.

moshe kupferman

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moshe kupferman

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Contacted the head of his collection in Israel. Toured his old atelier, which is now a museum. Browsed some works on paper in storage, and purchased a piece! It shows the element of the grid – the parallel lines and the criss-cross lines – a recurrent everyday framework that is present throughout Kupferman’s oeuvre. It also demonstrates his Free Variations, exposing the performative-musical dimension of his painting: elements appear, disappear, and reappear, and in the process bring about the creation of a rhythmic and melodious practice that is the artist’s unique language.

Ilit Azoulay

Ilit Azoulay, Hisin series, staircase, 2011, 23x51 inch, inkjet print

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Here, the artist says it best:

Artist Statement

My work is based on processed photographic montage, which involves field research and computerized finalization. The works contain thousands of images reorganized and remodeled together to create new utopian venues.Oftentimes I start by spotting buildings that are slated for demolition. Usually they are located in the old, southern parts of Tel-Aviv, where I live.

In my studio, I clean and oil objects from the sites – sometime even interfering with the original shape or color – that is, I remodel them. When they are ready for the ‘stage’, I photograph each object separately, oftentimes from the same angle, using the same macro-lens and under the same light to ensure their homorganic status; the photographed objects will serve to facilitate democratic viewing conditions, which eliminates all hierarchies. At this point I start the process of constructing the “wall” in Photoshop. On this artificial structured canvas, I place and arrange the photographed objects, forming large-scale panoramas that simulate a fictitious space.

The human vision is functional and goal-oriented, so it often misses alternative possibilities of perception and observation.
 Guided by the desire to expand these possibilities, I am interested in creating utopian, fictitious, even ‘impossible’ spaces that point toward the limitations of sight and undermine the conventional process of seeing. Through them I wish to make the gap between perception and the construction of meaning present.

Sigal Primor: Awry

SCULPTURES 2010-2011

I worked briefly at Chelouche Gallery in Tel Aviv, Israel. This was the exhibit on view at the time. These prolific pieces show a technical skill that is extraordinarily meticulous and idiosyncratic.

There is a masculinity to the constructed forms that is complimented by the organic, earth-toned felt that is inviting to the touch. They clash both physically and metaphorically: metal vs. material, male vs. female.

Untitled (1), 2010, Mixed media, 161X70X210 cm

Untitled (2), 2010, Mixed media, 177X83X184 cm

Untitled (2), 2010, Mixed media, 177X83X184 cm (Detail)

Untitled (3), 2010, Mixed media, 238X192X310 cm

Untitled (3), 2010, Mixed media (Detail)

Untitled (3), 2010, (Felt Detail)

Untitled (4), 2010, Mixed Media

Untitled (4), 2010, Mixed Media (Detail)

Untitled (5), 2010, Installation (Detail 2 Segments of a chair)

Awry, Installation View, Chelouche Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel