Tagged: New York

rachel whiteread

Drawing for Water Tower, I. 1997. Graphite with cut-and-pasted color photocopy, varnish and ink on graph paper, 33 1/8 x 23 1/4" (84.1 x 59.1 cm). Purchase. (1623.2000) Image licenced to Elizabeth Cline Hammer Museum by Elizabeth Cline Usage : - 4600 X 4600 pixels (A3) © Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource

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Untitled (Stairs) 2001 Rachel Whiteread born 1963 Purchased from funds provided by the Art Fund and Tate Members 2003 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T07939

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ross iannatti

Ross Iannatti’s recent body of work Hysterisis uses discarded materials collected from automobile impound lots, specifically the industrial nylon found in the interior of car steering wheels and passenger seats that is often covered in oil, dirt and other imprints from the material’s previous life. Iannatti dissects sections of the nylon, cutting squares and rectangles to create geometric patterns that he then sews together. Informed by the grid, a concept in art making that has evolved over the past century through the work of artists like Kasmir Malevich, Agnes Martin and Sean Scully, the squared patterns of softly colored blues, yellows, pinks and grays are formally compelling.

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The black holes are “as much of life as possible – no barriers – no boundaries – all freedom in every sense.” Lee Bontecou

There is something so harrowing about staring into Bontecou’s sculptures. They are at once primordial and other worldly, projecting outward and eerily enveloping you, overwhelming you. Her seemingly bottomless black holes reflect no light and no life, and yet, they are self referential — representing life itself as boundless and limitless.

urs fischer. phallic. funny.

Meret Oppenheim. Object. Paris, 1936

This Surrealist object was inspired by a conversation between Oppenheim and artists Pablo Picasso and Dora Maar at a Paris cafe. Admiring Oppenheim’s fur-covered bracelet, Picasso remarked that one could cover anything with fur, to which she replied, ‘Even this cup and saucer.’ Soon after, when asked by André Breton, Surrealism’s leader, to participate in the first Surrealist exhibition dedicated to objects, Oppenheim bought a teacup, saucer, and spoon at a department store and covered them with the fur of a Chinese gazelle. In so doing, she transformed genteel items traditionally associated with feminine decorum into sensuous, sexually punning tableware.

christo and jeanne-claude

“For them, the purpose of their art has been to simply give new perspective to familiar landscapes, to refresh and draw attention to these sites — even their overly familiar urban-scapes. Their art, which is so strong and majestic, rejects any meaning beyond itself. Perhaps, that’s where its power lies and builds upon itself. It’s pure.”