Tagged: studio

CHAYKA SOFIA

 

 

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My good friends, who I admire dearly — Natasha Subramaniam & Alisa Lapidus are a multimedia artist, filmmaker duo who create unconventional, dynamic work that seeks the push the visual and narrative parameters of representing cuisine and gastronomy. Deeply inspired by the raw beauty and culture of food, they co-founded the Los Angeles based studio, CHAYKA SOFIA, with a passion to produce interdisciplinary projects that merge the cinematic and culinary worlds.

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moshe kupferman

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moshe kupferman

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Contacted the head of his collection in Israel. Toured his old atelier, which is now a museum. Browsed some works on paper in storage, and purchased a piece! It shows the element of the grid – the parallel lines and the criss-cross lines – a recurrent everyday framework that is present throughout Kupferman’s oeuvre. It also demonstrates his Free Variations, exposing the performative-musical dimension of his painting: elements appear, disappear, and reappear, and in the process bring about the creation of a rhythmic and melodious practice that is the artist’s unique language.

Ilit Azoulay

Ilit Azoulay, Hisin series, staircase, 2011, 23x51 inch, inkjet print

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Here, the artist says it best:

Artist Statement

My work is based on processed photographic montage, which involves field research and computerized finalization. The works contain thousands of images reorganized and remodeled together to create new utopian venues.Oftentimes I start by spotting buildings that are slated for demolition. Usually they are located in the old, southern parts of Tel-Aviv, where I live.

In my studio, I clean and oil objects from the sites – sometime even interfering with the original shape or color – that is, I remodel them. When they are ready for the ‘stage’, I photograph each object separately, oftentimes from the same angle, using the same macro-lens and under the same light to ensure their homorganic status; the photographed objects will serve to facilitate democratic viewing conditions, which eliminates all hierarchies. At this point I start the process of constructing the “wall” in Photoshop. On this artificial structured canvas, I place and arrange the photographed objects, forming large-scale panoramas that simulate a fictitious space.

The human vision is functional and goal-oriented, so it often misses alternative possibilities of perception and observation.
 Guided by the desire to expand these possibilities, I am interested in creating utopian, fictitious, even ‘impossible’ spaces that point toward the limitations of sight and undermine the conventional process of seeing. Through them I wish to make the gap between perception and the construction of meaning present.

blow job

last year, for my birthday, schwebel decided he wanted to give me a gift.

i’m sitting by the cluttered, barely-lit desk of his studio. nestled in the hills of ein karem, just southwest of jerusalem, the studio space feels more like a cavern, complete with a wood-burning heater and a small lived-in bed. thick, stone walls of what was once an arab home keep us cozily warm. he wraps his hand around the neck of the bottle, “a glass of wine, babe?” i stop typing for a second and shake my head, “no, no thanks. i need to keep focused, you know.” we’d already split a small bottle of a great local cab over dinner. i felt full and flushed. “well, how about that present then?” he says as he slaps my knee. i perk up. he shoves back his chair and heads toward his collection, where huge canvases (worth thousands, mind you) collect dust. he begins to leaf through old sketches and etchings and pauses on a beautiful cityscape of tel aviv. perfect. i sit smugly. he flips past it, picks up a wooden panel painted bright blue, and studies it for a minute. i can’t quite make out the subject. it looks like two lovers. he turns back to me, “hey, you want a blowjob?” i raise an eyebrow, cock my head, “um, excuse me?” he hands me the piece of plywood. i stare, mouth agape. it is, in fact, a sketch, or more specifically, a self-portrait of schwebel receiving a blowjob. tediously detailed, the overt homage to the art of fellatio depicts a full-figured femme, conveniently unidentifiable, with an enraptured, generously hairy and perfectly perky schwebel, legs literally flailing. my eyes widen. i hesitate. schwebel grabs it out of my hands and sits back down on his cushion. he pulls out a sharpie and flips over the panel. “schwebel for sharon on her 24th birthday,” he writes and hands it back. “thanks for the blowjob,” i reply. 

 

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